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CAM Information Hub Database of IHRA Antisemitism Definition Adoptions by US States

Texas Governor Greg Abbott signs a bill adopting the IHRA Working Definition of Antisemitism and creating the Texas Holocaust, Genocide, and Antisemitism Advisory Commission, June 16, 2021.

February 23, 2022

A growing number of U.S. states have adopted or endorsed the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) Working Definition of Antisemitism, a welcome trend monitored by the Combat Antisemitism Movement (CAM) Information Hub.

A total of 30 U.S. states have done so thus far, according to data compiled by the CAM Information Hub.

One of the most effective steps a state can take — via legislation, resolutions, executive orders, and/or executive proclamations — to fight Jew-hatred is to adopt the IHRA Working Definition of Antisemitism — the most authoritative, comprehensive, and representative tool to delineate all of the contemporary manifestations of antisemitism. More than 800 entities worldwide have recognized it since 2016, establishing it as the most mainstream and commonly-accepted definition of antisemitism.

The definition says, “Antisemitism is a certain perception of Jews, which may be expressed as hatred toward Jews. Rhetorical and physical manifestations of antisemitism are directed toward Jewish or non-Jewish individuals and/or their property, toward Jewish community institutions and religious facilities.”

Its accompanying list of examples details 11 specific discriminatory behaviors targeting Jews and the State of Israel.

The following database of information on U.S. states that have adopted or endorsed the IHRA Working Definition of Antisemitism will be updated as developments warrant (current as of February 2022): 

– Alabama: Endorsed by Governor Kay Ivey in January 2022 via an executive proclamation for International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

Read the executive proclamation here.

– Alaska: Endorsed by Governor Mike Dunleavy in April 2022 via an executive proclamation for Yom HaShoah.

Read the executive proclamation here.

– Arizona: Adopted by the state legislature and signed into law by Governor Doug Ducey in April 2022 in a bill ensuring that the IHRA Working Definition of Antisemitism will be considered by state authorities when investigating incidents of crime or discrimination.

Read the legislation here.

– Connecticut: Endorsed by Governor Ned Lamont via an executive statement in January 2020 for International Holocaust Remembrance Day, and again via an executive proclamation in November 2021 for “Shine A Light Week” during Hanukkah.

Read the executive statement here and the executive proclamation here.

– Florida: Adopted by the state legislature and signed into law by Governor Ron DeSantis in May 2019 in a bill that defines antisemitism and prohibits discrimination in Florida public schools based on religion.

Read the legislation here.

– Idaho: Endorsed via an executive proclamation by Governor Brad Little in January 2022 for International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

Read the executive proclamation here.

–  Iowa: Adopted by the state legislature and signed into law by Governor Kim Reynolds in March 2022.

Read the legislation here.

– Kansas: Adopted by the state legislature in March 2022 in a concurrent resolution recognizing antisemitism as a growing problem in the United States.

Read the concurrent resolution here.

– Kentucky: Adopted via a legislative resolution condemning antisemitism and signed by Governor Andy Beshear in February 2021.

Read the legislative resolution here.

– Louisiana: Adopted via a State Senate resolution in June 2022.

Read the resolution here.

– Maine: Adopted via a legislative joint resolution in January 2020 for International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

Read the legislative joint resolution here.

– Massachusetts: Adopted via a legislative resolution in January 2020 for International Holocaust Remembrance Day, and endorsed via an executive proclamation by Governor Charlie Baker in February 2022.

Read the legislative resolution here and the executive proclamation here.

– Montana: Endorsed via an executive proclamation by Governor Greg Gianforte in December 2021 for “Shine A Light Week” during Hanukkah.

Read the executive proclamation here.

– Nebraska: Endorsed via an executive proclamation by Governor Pete Ricketts in May 2022 for Jewish American Heritage Month and Israeli Independence Day.

Read the executive proclamation here.

– Nevada: Endorsed by Governor Steve Sisolak in January 2022 via an executive proclamation for International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

Read the executive proclamation here.

– New Hampshire: Endorsed by Governor Chris Sununu via an executive proclamation in January 2020 for International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

Read the executive proclamation here.

– New Mexico: Endorsed by Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham in August 2022 via an executive order.

Read more here.

– New York: Endorsed by Governor Kathy Hochul in June 2022 via an executive proclamation.

Read more here.

– Ohio: Endorsed by Governor Mike DeWine in April 2022 via an executive order.

Read the executive order here.

– Oklahoma: Endorsed by Governor Kevin Stitt in January 2022 via an executive proclamation for International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

Read the executive proclamation here.

– Rhode Island: Endorsed by then-Governor Gina Raimondo via an executive proclamation in January 2020 for International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

Read the executive proclamation here.

– South Carolina: Adopted via a proviso to the annual state budget bill in May 2018, but only on the books for one year.

Read the budget bill here.

– South Dakota: Endorsed by Governor Kristi Noem via an executive proclamation in December 2021 for “Shine A Light Week” during Hanukkah.

Read the executive proclamation here.

– Tennessee: Endorsed by Governor Bill Lee via an executive proclamation in January 2022 for International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

Read the executive proclamation here.

– Texas: Adopted by the state legislature and signed into law by Governor Greg Abbott in May 2021 in a bill that created the Texas Holocaust, Genocide, and Antisemitism Advisory Commission.

Read the legislation here.

– Utah: Endorsed by Governor Spencer Cox via an executive proclamation in January 2022 for International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

Read the executive proclamation here.

– Vermont: Endorsed by Governor Phil Scott via an executive proclamation in January 2020 for International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

Read the executive proclamation here.

– Virginia: Adopted via an executive order by Governor Glenn Youngkin in January 2022 which established a commission to combat antisemitism.

Read the executive order here.

– West Virginia: Endorsed by Governor Jim Justice via an executive proclamation in January 2022 for International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

Read the executive proclamation here.

– Wyoming: Endorsed by Governor Mark Gordon via an executive proclamation in January 2022 for International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

Read the executive proclamation here.